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. particularly we passed by a powerful bipartisan vote of 89-8, a bill that avoided tax increases for 99% of americans and extended emergency unemployment benefits for another year and protected us from the fiscal cliff. when it comes to legislating, the senate actually has a pretty strong bipartisan record. how did those senate bills do on the house side? well, the house couldn't pass its own highway bill. congress has been doing highway bills since the eisenhower years. this isn't rocket science. the house couldn't do one. the best the house of representatives could do was to pass a short-term extension that allowed some of their members to get to conference on the senate bill. but they took no bill into conference because they couldn't pass one. even then they delayed the conference negotiations and they cost the united states of america an entire summer construction season for highway construction, putting thousands of jobs in jeopardy before they finally came around and passed an amended version of the senate bipartisan highway bill. so their record on the highway bill is nothing to
have proposed a tradable r&d tax credit to help early-stage companies to develop and commercialize their idea. it's worked in other states, and it's something we can do this session. i will work with the legislature to make it more desirable for small and medium size businesses to hire more people and to do a better job commercializing the technology developed in our world-class research institutions, connecting the dots from the classroom to the laboratory to the marketplace. we've got to get that job done. and no economic strategy would be complete without a transportation plan that facilitates this growth. [applause] this session i expect to work with stakeholders that have already committed to a bipartisan plan to build an infrastructure for the next generation. in the next ten years, our population will grow by approximately three quarters of a million people, but we will not add one more square inch of dirt. to honestly address our infrastructure, we've got to recognize that in transportation, creativity is just as important as concrete. [applause] i want to turn our innovati
an outdated and anticompetitive tax code, and to streamline government bureaucracies that are literally suffering job creation. they have done their jobs while senate democrats have tried to keep their priorities secret. now, we know senate democrats don't like the house budgets, and we know they don't even support the president's budgets, at least not with their votes. what we haven't known for nearly four years is what they're for, because they have refused to put their plans for the country down on paper and actually vote for them. now it's my hope that the democratic sudden interest in passing a budget isn't just another attempt to actually raise taxes. as i've said repeatedly, we're done with the revenue issue. the president has already said that the so-called rich are now paying their -- quote -- "fair share" -- end quote, and of course middle-class families are already on the hook for new taxes as a result of obamacare. so the question is who would be in the firing line this time? and at what cost? look, struggling families shouldn't have to pick up the tab again for washington'
austerity or the taxes are used to bail out governments on the other side of the continent. we are starting to see this in the demonstrations on the streets of athens, magid and world. we're starting to see it in the parliaments of berlin, helsinki and the hague. and yes, of course, we are seeing this frustration with the eu very dramatically here in the united kingdom. europe's leaders have a duty to hear these concerns. indeed, we have a duty to act on them. and not just to fix the problems in the eurozone. for just as in any emergency you should plan for the aftermath as well as dealing with the present crisis, so, too, in the midst of the present challenges we should plan for the future, and what the world will look like when the difficulties and the eurozone have been overcome. now, the biggest danger to the european union comes not from those who advocate change, but from those who denounce new thinking as heresy. in its long history europe has experience of heretics who turned out to have a point. and my point is this. more the same on the secure a long-term future for the eurozone.
in louisiana including the tax reform he's just launched in the past few weeks, what he's doing is trying to think about how at this moment at a time when globalization's putting enormous pressures on working class voters, at a time when the economy is going through a very complicated, difficult moment when it's not clear how to get back to growth, he's thinking creatively about how to use the strength of his state to build on its weaknesseses. and i think at the national level that's what conservatives have to do. to some extempt, it's being done. i would say the policy agenda that has to come at the end of that conversation is not fully worked out by any means, but the questions are being asked. i think the direction of thinking has been helpful even in the wake of the election. if you listen to what people like marco rubio or paul ryan have been saying, it's different from what they themselves were saying six months ago, a year ago. i think the focus is turning to the right place. that doesn't mean that he'll persuade the public, but it certainly helps to ask the right question if you'
and firearms on the tax issue if we get busted on the, on the drug dealers and others. it can go a long way. does that make since? >> well look, the federal government, i agree with mayor daley. the federal government played a key role in what it puts resource. you have the g8 over, atm -- atf over here. u.s. attorney, each user can do something different. i think this has to be central, focus for u.s. attorney and for the federal government and to more integrated. i'll give you one example. where we in different parts of the city, englewood, austin, brought the federal government because with additional resources for those different respective law enforcement agencies in those areas. we seen a decline in homicide. you see that in inglewood, in austin. so how the federal government plays a role on the enforcement side, i'm not sure what, i think if i'm interpreting what he just said, if you can't get them from the pure prosecution, violation of tax laws, al capone is a better example, yes. spent her fester, how effective do you believe that gun buyback programs could be? you see more local
at 19 for senator hatfield, i had the very good fortune to be assigned to the tax reform act of 1976. and then i had the even better fortune that it came up on the floor of the senate. so during the many days it was before this body i sat up in the staff gallery and watched as amendment after amendment was raised and debated on and voted on. there was no camera, no email, the member of the senate team that was responsible for it would run down from the staff gallery, intercept your senator, explain what the issue was, what had been said about it, what folks back home thought about it, what the set of motions had been done on it, and it was a legislature at work. and rarely, rarely did the thought that anything would not be decided by 51 pass the minds of the senators. that was something observed, that objection to 51 was reserved for very special occasions, very rare occasions you might do once or twice in your career. i do -- i do feel like the conversation we have before us is so important, and i thought i'd put up this chart. this just dramatizes -- and my colleague can see it --
finance minister started an initiative on this that this year g8 will look at tax evasion and tax fraud. i think it's enormously important issue, and i think the regulation on the shadow banking system, um, also needs to play a very important role for the russia meeting for the g20. we have quite a lot of regulation for our banks, basel iii comes to mind here. here, actually, we have to be vigilant that the lending capacity that is to boost, after all, economic growth doesn't get too contained, too limited, and i can only hope and join our partners in the united states to introdiscuss deuce this -- introduce this as well, otherwise a new imbalance here. through better regulation of banks, the capital that they need to the capital reserves that they need to have, we also see moral hazard in the sense that people increasingly seem to fly into the shadows of shadow banking. we were at one in saying when we agreed this at the g20 and the thought that every financial instrument, um, every financial be product, every financial market needs to be placed in regulation. we are very far from that. i
tax dollars, billions of them. and now all of a sudden some are suggesting we should change the rules when we are hit by the first major disaster to hit the new york city region in a very long time. that's not fair. that's not right. and we have argued against it, and i hope my colleagues will defeat the lee amendment. and i also say to my colleagues that this is not just dollars and cents. these are people who care, are waiting, homeowners waiting to rebuild their homes. they haven't moved back in. small business owners who are hanging on by a thread after building a business for 25 years. we know when the hand of god strikes, it's overwhelming for them. take rita from emerald magic lawn care. her company helps local families, schools and businesses with lawn care in the spring and summer and around the holidays they help with decorations and lights. but emerald magic's business was interrupted for many weeks. the client base dried up. rita's business will be in huge trouble. it may not survive if she doesn't get a lifeline and get one now. so this is very important. week after week,
majority support on a cloture vote: the dream act, bring jobs home act, small business jobs and tax relief act, paying fair share act of 2012, repeal big oil tax subsidies act, teachers and first responders back-to-work act, american jobs act of 2011, public safety employer-employee cooperation act, paycheck fairness act, creating american jobs and ending offshoring act. now, again -- again, it's not that the bill was filibustered. the right to even debate these bills and vote on them was filibustered. one thing, he go on the bill and they filibuster. no, we couldn't even debate it. even though a majority of senators voted for cloture. not 60 but a majority. so the majority thwarted from even bringing these up and debating them and even letting people offer amendments. now, it used to come that if a senator opposed a bill, he or she would engage in a spirited debate, try to change people's minds, attempt to persuade the public, offer amendments, vote "no," and then try to hold members who voted "yes" accountable at the ballot box. isn't that what it's about? in contrast, today, to quote fo
spending and i don't think we can continue to tax the american economy. we need economic growth but it's about prioritizing spending. i have conservative beliefs foreign aid can be useful, but we have to get our spending out of control. we utilize the position to encourage the president to work with us in good faith to solve the debt and deficit issue >> i spent six months i guess it was or five months as a member of the super committee. and i put an enormous amount of energy and hope that we would be able to get the bigger bargain. i'm not here to go through the details of why we didn't, that there was a very hard line monitor negotiating position that prevented us from being able to come to an agreement which incidentally we just came to. but we can to this with far less on the table and far less accomplished than we would have if we had come to that agreement six months ago or a year ago. my hope is yes, i certainly will weigh in on that and the degree that it does not impact on - devotee to do my job and the ability of the state department to be able to do its job. we cannot reduce
of the tax around 4 p.m. on that day, and you're involved widely in the coordinator response which included the department of defense at the white house but did not speak to the president until later that evening. when did you talk to the president? >> two things. on a first lady made, carbon, the arb disagreed with that and did find that budget issues were asked to speak she testified under oath. >> that's why have an independent group like arb. that's why he was created to look at everything. so i think -- >> everybody has their own -- >> i think it's important -- [talking over each other] >> what about when you saw the president? when did you see the president? >> i talked to the present at the end of the day, but i've been in constant communication with the national security advisor. i had been on secure videoconferences with high level officials in the white house, in the defense department -- >> she testified she had witnessed the death in real-time, the attack on a monitor. at any time did you see the initial attack on a monitor to? >> congressman, there was no monitor. there was no
that such presentations of a tax that would happen again a couple other questions i know you put the individuals defined as culpable by the board on the last administrative leave what do you anticipate will be the final resolution of the status in the department and the accountability review board didn't identify any individuals above the secretary assistant secretary level as accountable for the failures of the benghazi mission? use of the numerous tables requesting and begging for additional security resources sent by the ambassador were never sent by the state officials above the assistant secretary or assistant secretary charlene. i know that you care about the people that work with you and the department so given the fact your testimony is in these multiple requests and no levels of these requests doesn't that give you some concerns about the flow of information in the department and maybe some of your other links of ability to prioritize and get your attention serious issues you said that you get hundreds of thousands of the time and these cables directly i understanding you don't read them all or
's eve, taxes as a practical matter when up for everyone in the country at midnight. the senate republicans and subsequently a majority of the house voted to make 99 percent of the bush tax cuts permanent, thereby preventing another event like new year's eve. that came about because the law sunset it. we now have achieved permanency for 99 percent of the american people on tax issues. i would venture to say there is not a single republican vote in the house or senate to provide more revenue. the reason for that is we know revenue is not the problem. the president has been able to give all the revenue he wanted by raising taxes on everyone making above 200,250,000 per couple. it barely been able to operate the government for about eight days. this is not a revenue problem. this is a spending problem. yes. the revenue issue is behind us. whenever new taxes the president is going to get, he got. the operation of law. and we are now going to focus on the real problems which is not the we tax too little, but spend too much. yes, that is where we are. >> a convention of the debt limit
shared sacrifice on behalf of all and to make sure that all pay their fair share of taxes in this country so that we can once again do what we did in 1993. we can do it again if only my friends on the republican side will join with us in making sure we raise the necessary revenues to get us out of this hole that we're in. madam president, with that i yield the floor. a senator: the senator from missouri. a senator: madam president, i ask unanimous consent that the period for morning business continue until 2:00 p.m. today and that all provisions o of the previous order rean in effect. remain in effect. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection, so ordered. the senator from missouri. a senator: madam president, this is the first time i've spoken since you've been in the chair and i want to say welcome to the senate. i want to talk about a baseball great, a missouri great, stan musual, who passed away on saturday at the age of 92. stan musual was born in november of 1920 in denora, pennsylvania. he was -- his title was "stan the man." he was the youngest o
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15